Beached Bird Diary, 2017 - 2018

This diary reflects my beached bird surveys in Northeast England.

You may select any photograph to enlarge it.

26 May 2018, Whitley Bay

 

A dry day with temperature 12-14 C and rising tide while my beach survey was performed between 11 am and 2 pm. The shore was quite clean with a fairly light deposit of dead seaweed and presence of many flies. Live birds included a pied wagtail, carrion crow, three passing fulmars, herring gulls and northerly movement of sandwich terns. My beached bird finds, on southern section, comprised: guillemot skull with upper mandible and remains of a second guillemot (first-year in age) from which the exposed sternum was collected.

Whitley Bay beach (north) with boulder clay cliffs, 26 May 2018
First-year guillemot sternum from Whitley Bay beach

28 April 2018, Philosophical Enquiry

 

The photograph shows Michael Atkinson on the top floor at the Old Low Light, North Shields fish quay. He had readied the room for a Philosophical Enquiry involving meditation and mindfulness. The stimulus for the event was plastic in the oceans, so I had brought artefacts and gave a short presentation to help get things underway. It was a very interesting experience with a good group of people to talk about their ideas and consider what could be done to help resolve the problem.

Michael at the Old Low Light for Philosophical Enquiry.

10 March 2018, Druridge Bay, Northumberland

 

On a stretch of 1.5 km there were 14 recently beached guillemot corpses, three puffins, two razorbills and a pair of herring gull wings. I collected a complete adult guillemot and first-year puffin along with some bird bones. The poor weather (snow, easterly winds, rough sea and cold conditions) of the past fortnight has been taking a toll on our seabirds. All today’s auks were emaciated.

Adult guillemot, Druridge Bay, Northumberland, 10 March 2018

22-23 February 2018, Netherlands

 

Remaining for extra days after the Fulmar Workshop, I received tuition from Susanne Kühn concerning fulmar stomach contents analysis. Susanne instructed on stomach flushing as well as sorting, cleaning, weighing and identification of the contents. She is working towards a PhD and carrying out research with Dr Jan Andries van Franeker at Wageningen Marine Research.

Sorting fulmar stomach contents, The Netherlands

16-21 February 2018, Netherlands, Fulmar Workshop

 

Attending this international workshop was most interesting. Attendees came from: Iceland (1), Norway (1), Germany (5), Holland (5), Belgium (4), Spain (2), Scotland (5) and England (2). The photograph shows our group at its maximum attendance by 25 people on Sunday, 18 February outside Wageningen Marine Research, Den Helder. We performed laboratory analysis on northern fulmars and Cory’s shearwaters, attended a discussion day and enjoyed some birding on the wonderful island of Texel. This workshop, the fourteenth since the first in 2002, was organised, as always, by Dr Jan A van Franeker.

Fourteenth International Fulmar Workshop, The Netherlands

16 December 2017, Druridge Bay

 

For my monthly Druridge Bay beached bird survey I was joined by Laura from Coast Care. We found the wing remains from an adult black-headed gull at the high tide strand line. The outermost primary feather of each wing was still in growth. One leg accompanied the find, which was likely a fox kill. The weather was bright, but cold with ice nearby. We also collected single moulted feathers from gannet, great black-backed gull, herring gull, kittiwake and curlew. The shore was relatively clean as we walked and the tide approached. A pair of bright and active stonechats accompanied us a while.

Walking Druridge Bay, Northumberland, December 2017.

18 October 2017, Dove Marine Laboratory (Wednesday)

 

Two northern fulmars were processed at the Dove Marine Laboratory today with a range of tissue samples collected for the future. The bird shown here was an immature female. For part of the day we were joined by a film crew from the BBC ‘Inside Out’ series who came to record our findings and learn more. The work proceeded nicely. To help during the analysis we had Russell Davis on hand and two Newcastle University Masters students.

Fulmar NEE-2017-003 ready for analysis at

the Dove Marine Lab (Newcastle University) on Wednesday, 18 Oct 2017.

9 August 2017, Dove Marine Laboratory (Wednesday)

 

It was the Dove Marine Lab heritage open day and the beached bird group had been invited to have a table. I dropped things off on Tuesday afternoon and started to set up our display. Included were three of the specimens newly prepared by taxidermist Adrian Johnstone with a grant from the Northumberland and Tyneside Bird Club. Table set up concluded in the early morning before visitors started to arrive and tour the building. It was a great day with lots of visitors, of all ages, asking questions about the different bird projects. A wonderful, newly designed (by Gemma McGregor) and printed, colour poster was ready to include at our stand.

 

 

Beached bird and fulmar display in the

Dove Marine Laboratory (Cullercoats)

on Wednesday, 9 August 2017.

16-18 May 2017, Dove Marine Laboratory

 

Three days in the Dove Marine Laboratory (Newcastle University) allowed initial processing of eight fulmars found dead in northeast England and eastern Scotland. Assistance came from members of our beached bird group surveyors. The seabird stomachs were removed for contents analysis, to be carried out in the Netherlands by researchers from Wageningen Marine Research as part of the ‘Save the North Sea’ fulmar project.

Beached bird surveyor Aurélie Bohan is shown assisting in the Dove laboratory on Tuesday, 16 May. Aurélie is employed by the Northumberland Wildlife Trust as Living Seas Officer. Together we worked on two fulmars, both found dead on the coast of Northumberland.

15 April 2017, Old Low Light, North Shields fish quay

 

With an attentive audience seated, my presentation progressed on the theme of the beached bird and fulmar projects in northeast England and beyond. Outside the weather was bright and sunny, but a little on the chilly side. Those attending came up with a variety of questions which I attempted to answer. We concluded with a short presentation about some of the birds of the river mouth. There were newsletters for browsing and an information sheet to take away. One of the birds on display was a very smart immature drake eider which was staying with me for a few short days.

Display and information table,

Old Low Light, second floor,

15 April 2017

March 2017, Druridge Bay

 

It was a grey day with a drizzly morning as I started my Druridge Bay beached bird survey on 29 March. Three guillemots were found – an adult and two first-year birds. Other finds comprised black-headed gull and kittiwake, but neither was quite complete and both had been dead for several weeks. There were also three or four rabbit carcasses.

 

 

Druridge Bay scene,

Northumberland,

29 March 2017

Kittiwake adult, right wing remains,

Druridge Bay,

Northumberland,

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

22 – 23 February 2017, Bird Display

 

I organised a bird and shore display at the Old Low Light (North Shields fish quay) on Wednesday - Thursday, 22 - 23 Feb 2017. This was in the heritage gallery where I talked with visitors. We discussed such subjects as birds of the shore, Tyne birds, nesting gulls, fulmars in the North Sea and beached birds. Visitors were shocked and surprised by the extent of the effects of marine litter and pleased to hear about our study and its aims to improve the marine environment.

The little auk is a winter visitor from the arctic to the North Sea.

Photograph: Thursday, 23 February 2017

February 2017, North Tyneside

 

There were two first-year puffins on Tynemouth Longsands to be collected on Sunday 19th. Prof Mike Harris reported to me that the only other UK beached puffins of which he was aware this winter were three from Orkney i.e. two first-year and one second-year bird. On both Tynemouth Longsands (19th) and Whitley Bay beach (20th) very many white cuttlebones were to be seen at the uppermost strandlines. I do not recall seeing as many cuttlebones here in the past 14 years.

One of two first-year puffins found today and collected,

Tynemouth,

Sunday, 19 February 2017

Two common cuttlefish cuttlebones and part of a whelk shell,

Whitley Bay,

Monday, 20 February 2017

January 2017, beach surveys

 

I found no bird remains to speak of. During my Druridge Bay survey I watched a bright pair of stonechat and spotted the body of a rabbit. Whitley Bay beach produced some icicles at the base of the cliffs as I recorded six lively rock pipits and two meadow pipits feeding amongst the shore detritus with turnstones and sanderlings too.

Coal dust on the sand,

Druridge Bay,

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Fossilised shellfish stone and flint,

Whitley Bay,

Friday, 27 January 2017

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